Tag monitoring and evaluation

Jane Carter, August 2016 0

Monitoring women’s engagement in governance and peace building

The first scheduled meeting back in the office after the holidays: What to do about the apparently low engagement of women in our projects supporting governance and peace-building (internally known as GOP)? The meeting was prompted by a review of our Performance Indicators, those standardised indicators on which all country programmes have to report annually,

Weiter
Jane Carter, June 2016 0

Where the money goes…Tracking spending on gender and social inclusion

A blog posting a little while ago discussed gender-responsive budgeting, and specifically how we are supporting municipalities in Kosovo with this tool. Yet what of our own project and programme spending? Can such a form of budgeting and accounting also be applied? This was the topic yesterday in another of our sporadic Webinars, linking different staff

Weiter
Jane Carter, January 2016 5
© Helvetas

Monitoring changing lives: Dalit women in Nepal

Our sporadic series of lunchtime talks got off to a good start this year with a presentation of an Impact Assessment of the Employment Fund in Nepal, a large project managed by Helvetas and financially supported by SDC, DFID and the World Bank. We have an organisational commitment to organise two or three rigorous Impact

Weiter
Riff Fullan, July 2015 0

KM, learning and rocket science

A recent visit to our program office in Pakistan reminded me about the multiple possibilities around promoting more knowledge and learning (K&L) in our work, including both within the organisation and amongst the partners we are working with. I was facilitating an exercise looking at how our program in Pakistan could strengthen the K&L element

Weiter
Jane Carter, February 2015 0
© Helvetas

The challenge of measuring women’s empowerment

It is rare that we Helvetas staff members “indulge” in writing papers for journals. Some of us enjoy the challenge of so doing, but in general it is one of those activities that is additional to our regular work, and for which it is difficult to find time. So when a colleague, Sarah Byrne, spotted

Weiter